The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literatures

Bill Ashcroft, School of English, University of New South Wales; Gareth Griffiths, Department of English, University of Western Australia; Helen Tiffin, Department of English, University of Queensland

POLITICAL DISCOURSE: THEORIES OF COLONIALISM AND POSTCOLONIALISM

NOTES

  1. The development of English immediately before and after the First World War was also the result of the growing commercial and imperial rivalry between the great powers with the emergence of a strong Germany under Prussian influence in the late nineteenth century. English studies were designed to meet the challenge of German philology and its claims to dominance in language studies. [back]

  2. Significantly, despite America's emergence as a super-power this process of literary hegemony has not occurred there. Although many West Indian and African writers have settled in America they are not claimed as American, so much as contributors to Black writing. [back]

  3. Whilst the orthography employed may seem unfortunate, suggesting by its use of the upper and lower cases respectively that the variants are lesser, this is clearly not our intention. We prefer to see the use of the lower case as a sign of the subversion of the claims to status and privilege to which English usage clings. [back]

© 1989 Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin. Reprinted from Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin, The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literatures (London and New York: Routledge, 1989) 2-12. ISBN: 0-415-01209-0 (print version); 0-203-40262-6 (electronic version). Orders for the book can be placed via the web on: www.routledge.com or book.orders@routledge.co.uk. The book is also available in electronic format, for details please contact www.tandf.co.uk or www.eBookstore.tandf.co.uk. This excerpt is reprinted with the permission of Taylor & Francis.

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